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Colorfully Indifferent Keishia Sharine | Florida PDF Print E-mail
Angels - Interviews
Written by Khalid "Bless" Bey | As Seen in NY Times Bestseller Rat Bastards   
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In a living room somewhere in North America sits an angel. I fell in love with her look and yes, I requested an opportunity to spend a little time learning her story. As she answers my probing questions, it just happens to be movie night with the fam. "My dad is to my right with Maggie, our dog, on his lap," she tells me and a picture slowly develops. "My mother, who is to the right of him, is sitting upright eyes pinned on the TV and my brother to the right of her. We've probably watched this 2017 film 50 times but the room is silent."

 

 

The irony is as I organize these words into an editorial, my son Orion-Jean is asleep to the left me while I sit up in bed catching up on one of my favorite shows on Netflix. I can't lie, I am immensely enjoying her responses, noting a sense of charming indiference. Named Keishia Sharine, she admits to this charming indifference. "I find it hard to build friendships and relationships due to me not being emotionally there," she states rather frankly and I appreciate her candor.


 

"I'm originally from an island called Roatan, right off the coast of Honduras" Keishia says and you can almost smell the pride in her words. The biggest of the three islands, Roatan is where Keishia lived until the age of eleven when Florida became her home. "Transitioning from island life was difficult in it's own," she explains, "special but very educational. We moved around several times and finally settled in Pembroke Pines."


With such a unique look, rare in the modeling industry, I am utterly fascinated by the bloodlines that are responsible. "My ancestors are a mix of Europeans, Native Indians and Africans, which is normal where I’m from," informs Keishia. "The island’s culture embraces all avenues from all over. Mine specifically  is undefined, I’ve grown up dancing along with the Garifunas, celebrating our our independence with the Hispanics and singing country with the Whites." Wow, I think to myself. Her lineage is impressive.


 

A youthful Keishia was one girl growing up amongst a group of boys and she did not particularly enjoy it. "Imagine being the target for almost everything," she recalls, "I was their personal practice dummy when wrestling was huge." Two left feet prohibited her from flourishing at soccer, she wasn't quite quick enough for baseball, swimming in deep water to catch fish frightened her however she excelled at a few things they could not.


 

At age sixteen, an insistent Uncle relayed urgently to a brighted-eyed Keishia and her parents to send her to modeling school and the idea planted itself in her pretty head. Eventually after graduating highschool, she signed up for beauty school, earned a cosmetology license and started modeling. She fell in love with the creativity and the distinctive art of modeling. "It gives the opportunity to do anything, be anything," she pines, "even for a moment. Although a photo can last forever."


Once a model, it wasn't long before she was connecting with fashion designers, other models and artists she previously deemed out-of-reach. "It's quite astouding," she says excitedly. "The income has changed my entire logic on life, I'm able to help my family out way more than I did before; it has been a great blessing." To further her modeling career, she has learned one vital lesson from a friend on what it takes to succeed. "Consistency," she insists, "my great friend Emmanuel Geoge reminds me almost every time we speak that... Consistency Creates Reality."

 


When she is not the subject of a photographer's camera, or an artist's muse, she is an artist as well. As a licensed cosmetologist and also a painter, Keishia works on many canvases creating works of art. "I would like to create an impact on people that would last forever," she mentions. "Honestly modeing would finance my dreams of opening a woman's center and developing an app that would allow cosmetologists to grow small companies."


Career aside, life goes on in the world and it's not always such an uplifting place. Each of us has something in our lives that brings us a daily dose of joy, for our angel it happens to be two dogs she affectionately addresses as her children; Maggie and Hamlet. "They're both adopted," she explains, "Hamlet was adopted a day before they were going to put him down and he swears he's a bully, only when he's hungry. Maggie, as tiny as she is never gets tired, she's zooming from one side of the house to the other all day. She usually puts on her puppy-dog face and gently scratches your palm to insinuate she's hungry."

 


A night out alone or with friends is another way to help combat negative vibes. "Some of the best places I know for a good time are between Miami and Fort Lauderdale," she says, clearly taken back by memories of her life afterdark. "You can actually start from West Palm Beach and come down, I promise most of my best nights were city hopping." When Florida can no longer hold her restless spirit, there are special places she likes to visit. "I love traveling to the bahamas, the islands have a beautiful mix of city and island life. I tend to feel most comfortable on those grounds."


The world being as it is, finding balance is essential. We all have to find our own heaven on earth. "Seeing an Earth where people prioritize the health of the planet would be 'heaven on earth' for me," says a slightly altruistic Keishia. "Where we get together and start weighing the damage we cause and find ways to reverse it; together as a people." I can tell conversation with her would extend exponentially. "I can talk about the things once known of the world, history, religion, cultural practices," she informs me. "I can go on and on about the ancient pyramids, the amazons, and the 7 Wonders, afterlife and things of that matter."

 


Whenever I interview a clever and sharp-minded model, I can't help but weight two things; beauty versus brains. "Beauty doesn't have as much of an advantage as intelligence," Keishia explains, "an ugly mouth can mess up a pretty face. I don't just mean book smart, I actually mean emotional, physical, mental, spiritual and financial intelligence. Those traits can take you much further than a pretty face ever could."

 

 

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