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The Life of Nicole Sjoberg | Los Angeles, California, USA PDF Print E-mail
Angels - Interviews
Written by Khalid "Bless Theangels" Bey | Editor in Chief | As Seen in the NY Times Bestseller: Rat Bastards   
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Another one of those nights, ending a day where the clouds were out to play and the sun acted as chaperon, studiously standing watch over its billowy charges. They danced in the wind; huddled together to block the sun’s rays then broke apart letting the rays slip through to the earth below. In L.A. where the weather is the best thing about living there, as stated by our current angel, Nicole Sjoberg, I imagine days playing out and ending in a similar fashion regularly. It’s nights like these, the breeze is light and cool, its dark out but oddly illuminated, where you want to do more than just live, you want to ‘be’. You want to be more than just alive; you want the chance to just be… you.

 

 

“My life,” answers Nicole when asked what makes her who she is, you can’t truly be yourself when you don’t know who that is. “My background and dysfunctional sense of humor, where I come from and how it’s led me to see things,” she adds thoughtfully. I like the dysfunctional sense of humor she confesses to, its sounds strangely familiar, and my own ‘dysfunctional sense of humor,’ I thought of as just me expressing myself. When Nicole was younger, being an only child she development a rich imagination. “At the age of four I did in fact have imaginary friends,” she says. “As I got a bit older and was in the first years of school I was very outspoken! I was very sweet to the kids in my class. I was the type of girl that would give someone my recess snack if they didn’t have one and stand up for the ones that were being bullied!”

 

 

After becoming a model and public figure Nicole’s entire life changed. “I think it definitely helped me grow up and know myself so much better,” admits our angel. “It has been a spiritual journey. I am actually a singer first and then a model. I first started off in the music industry working with many different major record labels and a few producers from Sony. I had spent years growing up in the business as my mother, Beverly Sjoberg was a professional singer who actually opened for Aretha Franklin.” It was when her beloved mother passed she knew that music was where she belonged. “Though I grew up on the road,” she says, “music had always been my home, the one consistent thing that was that was there no matter what city I was in. Eventually because of the shoots I did for music and being in the spotlight a bit, it just naturally opened doors for the modeling and helped me to establish more of a foundation and stability for my life. It has also allowed me to travel to places I never thought I would and meet amazing people.”

 

 

“It wasn’t always easy!!” Nicole injects energetically. “There were a ton of tears shed along the way and my journey isn’t over. It was a very personal experience because as I’m writing music, finding a sound, honing my image, etc.… I had to dig deep into myself to find out what makes me, ME, which required a long look in the mirror and the strength to face my weaknesses and demons, in turn making me a stronger and more calculated in the things I wanted and the moves I made. So I would never take anything back!” With no regrets, she has come to value her experiences. “I think in order for someone to grow you have to be willing to look at yourself, good, bad and ugly and not be afraid of that because there’s only one you. Who in the world is going to know you better? So it’s important to know yourself and to grow… take risks that challenge your soul because you never know, you may find skills and talents in yourself you never even knew you had! Albert Einstein said, ‘A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new!”

 

 

Nicole grew up fast while on tour with her mother through the U.S. and Canada. Her mother was a professional singer… “Because of this it was just her and I and I was surrounded by adults in the music industry and became my mom’s ‘copilot’ so to speak…,” she recalls. “In school I had a bit of a hard time relating to kids my own age and preferred hanging out with the teachers. I would also very imaginative and would be in the car, on the road with the headphones on and get lost in music and just daydream. I would write poems in my English class and teachers would fail me because they didn’t believe I had written them. I had been to over 23 different schools by the time I was 14 so as a teenager, I don’t think kids really understood me.” Never feeling the need to fit in, Nicole shied away from ‘cliques’ and ‘social groups’ preferring to play it solo. “[I] would sometimes do rebellious things…,” she remembers, “like show up to school with underwear over my jeans saying ‘Kiss My Walmart Ass!’ on the back of them just to get a reaction.” When her mother passed, Nicole was just sixteen and high school really got tough. “My grades slipped and kids were mean…,” a slight pause before she continues, “I was rebelling and a little strange… and extremely wild. “Seemed like every week I was in the Principal’s office or getting kicked out of drama class or choir for some bizarre antic I pulled. I don’t think I did it to seek attention, I believed I did it out of rebelling against the system; to show there’s another way than ancient, conventional beliefs. I’ve always had this innate fighter in me and a lot of my fire is fueled by a desire to break down labels and get to the truth and realized the truth is really very simple. Needless to say my journey has made me adapt easily; to the poor, to the very rich, to the successful presidents of companies and to single mothers and fathers just trying to make ends meet. I think it’s made me well rounded.”

 

Well rounded and a fighter against tyranny and misinformation, Nicole is an angel of immense aptitude and passion. Her main passion is expressing herself and giving a piece of herself, sharing her soul with everyone around her. “I am forever a student of life,” she says. Modeling affords her ample opportunity for self-expression, something we emphatically endorse here in Angels Playpen. “I love that I can express myself, especially if it’s a shoot that I am in control of… where it’s my idea or I collaborate with someone who is on the same page and we are able to dive into depths or our minds and think of location, props, outfits, emotions, lighting, mood, movements. I love being able to communicate a range of emotions through a look in the eye or an outfit I’m wearing. I love that modeling can make someone think. It’s also a bit of therapy for my emotions. However I’m feeling that day,” she says, “I can convey in a healthy way!”

 

She is also very passionate about her family. “My father was Russian and Italian and my mother was Swedish and Scottish,” Nicole says of her heritage. Originally from Calgary, Canada, today Nicole has found refuge on the West Coast of the United States. “I now live in Los Angeles but will always be Canadian at heart,” she affirms. She loves the weather but also the cultural diversity. “LA is a melting pot of everything. People from all over the world live here. You can find anything and everything you want. Some of the best food and restaurants are here. The best part in my opinion is you can be in the craziness of the city, but where I live in Calabasas it’s just a twenty-minute drive and you are surrounded by mountains and feel secluded. I enjoy my privacy and quiet but when I want to let loose, I’m not too far away! Plus I do a lot of photo shoots out in Las Vegas with my business partner, photographer Doug Wimmer for Vision City Entertainment, so it’s great to be a small drive away.”

 

 

With such a rich history of learning about life and what truly matters, Nicole has certainly developed an idea of ‘heaven on earth,’ a person’s personal paradise. “When all people embrace themselves for who they are and respect theirs and everyone else’s individuality,” says Nicole describing her ‘heaven on earth.’ “See that there is more to life than conflict,” she offers. “Is conflict really necessary? The truth is love and love has no judgment. See behind the illusion of society, behind what the system wants or tells you to be, to stop seeing ourselves as separate through status or certain religious beliefs and realize we are all here. If we are breathing on this earth we have a purpose and something beautiful to offer.” She believes that everyone is important and everyone, especially women are beautiful. “Confidence is the definition of beauty. It’s not easy being a woman in this day and age… there are so many things women feel they have to look like. It’s so much pressure we put on ourselves. Women are threatened by other women and compete with other women and it’s stupid,” she says.

 

“You have religion telling women what they should be and how they need to conform in living their life, you have the media telling women what they should be, you have their men telling them what they should be; the list goes on,” Nicole explains the implications of beauty further. “The only way for a woman to truly feel confident and strong and beautiful in their own skin, body, mind and spirit is to say, screw what everyone else says! This is who I am, I like who I am and will grow to be better and stronger every day and TAKE THEIR DAMN POWER BACK!” With her, an agenda presents itself, one that could only benefit us all, so rather than silence her in any way I choose to let her words continue and allow her to express herself. “I am very open minded and open to new perspectives and love having educated conversations and debates,” she admits. Beauty is something that can be a gift and a curse, but mostly a gift to the beautiful. “Its society that makes it that was,” she responds. However, I have known tons of different women who were from different backgrounds, different looks but they carried themselves in a certain way and know how to get what they wanted. So if you know how to take your power back and own that, then honestly I have seen that go a lot further than looks. You just need to know how to use it. I am in talks with right now with people about doing seminars to showcase that issue so that every woman can be empowered!”